Salema

Salema, Haemulon califoreniensis

The Salema, Haemulon californiensis, whose common Spanish name is Salema, is a member of the Grunt or Haemulidae Family, known collectively as “Burros” in Mexico.

The Salemas have elongated thin bodies with a width that is 25-29% of length. They have an overall silvery appearance with six to eight orange-brown stripes on the upper two-thirds of their body; these stripes increase in number with maturity. They have large eyes and an oblique mouth with a projecting lower jaw. The spine base of their dorsal fin is longer than the base of the rayous part, a key to identification. They have a lateral line that follows one of their stripes, short pectoral fins, and a forked caudal fin. There is a black spot at the base of their caudal fin.

The Salemas are an inshore schooling species found near reefs or high in kelp forests at depths up to 110 feet. They reach a maximum length of 30 cm (12 inches) and weigh less than 1 kg (2.2 pounds). They feed at night on plankton. They are found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific. Very little is known about their behavioral patterns.

The Salema can be easily confused with the Longfin Salema, Xenichthys xanti (spinous part of dorsal fin shorter than base of rayous part; black spot at tail base), the Wavyline Grunt, Microlepidotus inornatus (narrow orange stripes covering body), and the Yelloweye Croaker, Odontoscion xanthops (rounded tail).

The Salemas are too small to be of interest to most but are consumed by subsistence fishermen on a limited basis.

Salema, Haemulon californiensis: Fish provided by the commercial fishermen of the greater Los Cabos area, Baja California Sur, June 2009, Size: 20 cm (8 inches).
Salema, Haemulon californiensis: Fish provided by the commercial fishermen of the greater Los Cabos area, Baja California Sur, June 2009, Length: 20.0 cm (8 inches).