Bigeye Trevally

Bigeye Trevally, Caranx sexfasciatus

The Bigeye Trevally, Caranx sexfasciatus, whose common Spanish name is “Jurel Voraz”, is a member of the Jack or Carangidae Family, known collectively as “Jureles and Pámpanos” in Mexico.

The Bigeye Trevally has an overall “jack-like” appearance with a moderately compressed deep elongated body with a width that is 24 to 28% of standard length. They are an iridescent blue-brown on the back shading to silvery white ventrally. They have a small black spot near the upper end of the gill covers and a white tipped dorsal fin lobe. The scutes are a yellowish black. The Bigeye Trevally has a rounded head profile with a disproportionately sized large eye, for which they are named. They have 15 to 19 gill rakers and 27 to 36 strong scutes. The lateral line has a pronounced relatively long anterior arch. The anal and dorsal fins have long lobes and the pectoral fins are longer than the head. The caudal fin is widely forked. The body is covered with small scales.

The Bigeye Trevally reach a maximum of 120 cm (47 inches) in length and 14.3 kg (31.5 pounds) in weight. They are a nocturnal pelagic schooling species that aggregated during the day adjacent to reefs at depths up to 315 feet. Juveniles are known to frequent estuaries and fresh water environments. They are opportunistic predators feeding on benthic and pelagic fishes as well as squid and crustaceans. They are a favorite prey of Sea Lions. The Bigeye Trevally is found in all Mexican waters of the Pacific with the exception of the northern half of the Sea of Cortez.

The Bigeye Trevally are most likely confused with the Pacific Crevalle Jack, Caranx caninus (wider body, dark spot at base of pectoral base) and the Black Jack, Caranx lugubris (dark fins and dark lateral line).

In some parts of the world (the Eastern Pacific and the Indian Ocean including the eastern, northern and western coastal waters of Australia) the Bigeye Trevally is a popular and prized game fish for recreational anglers. They are abundant at certain times of the year on the Cabo Pulmo Reef, Baja California Sur, where they are seen in massive schools and are of keen interest to scuba divers. As a food fish they are considered to be marginal.

Bigeye Trevally, Caranx sexfasciatus: Fish caught by Dr. William Inboden, III, Washington, D.C., off the surface on a flylinned sardine out of a one acre school of 24-inch Rainbow Runners, 15 miles north of Puerto Los Cabos, Baja California Sur, November 2003. Length: 76 cm (30 inches) and approximately 15 pounds.
Bigeye Trevally, Caranx sexfasciatus: Fish caught by Dr. William Inboden, III, Washington, D.C., off the surface on a flylinned sardine out of a one acre school of 24-inch Rainbow Runners, 15 miles north of Puerto Los Cabos, Baja California Sur, November 2003. Length: 76 cm (30 inches) and approximately 15 pounds.